Tea Dyeing: Part II

I finished my tea-stained shibori pieces today.  I used the tea stain as the base color, overdyeing/resisting using a dark indigo.  The organza piece turned out quite beautifully:

tea & indigo dyed organza on the drying rack
tea & indigo dyed organza on the drying rack
organza detail
organza detail

However, the bamboo scarf looks distinctly…unbeautiful:

tea & indigo dyed bamboo scarf on drying rack
tea & indigo dyed bamboo scarf on drying rack
bamboo scarf detail
bamboo scarf detail

I hate the way that my little square resists DID NOT RESIST!  All the lovely cream-colored tea dye went away.  I believe I need to crank down the clamping even tighter, although it was amazingly tightly clamped, let me just say.  I am going to re-work this piece–at this point, I can’t make it worse!

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Brett Barker

Brett Barker is a painter, textile artist, art/design instructor, and writer whose career spans more than 25 years. Originally from New Mexico, she now resides in Redondo Beach, California. She has taught fine art, artistic design, and textile design to numerous individuals, art guilds, and organizations throughout the U.S. She has a Master’s Degree in Art Education from the University of Nebraska. Her artwork sells throughout the U.S. and is available on her website, www.artistbrettbarker.com. She is currently undertaking a year-long investigation of Japanese shibori dyeing that will culminate in a trip to Japan to study under a master shibori artist in September of 2016. Her shibori blog can be found at www.peaceloveshibori.com. Her surface and textile designs can be found at www.brettbarkerdesign.com.

3 thoughts on “Tea Dyeing: Part II”

  1. Brett,
    Glad to see you got your Shibori blog up and going. The pieces
    off to the left look great; especially the evergreen and purple swatch. I read somewhere that wetting the fabric, wringing it out before you pleat and dye also helps to get more interesting results. When dyeing dry cloth; the fibers keeps absorbing the dyes up to certain point and stop. In the dampened cloth version; the moist fibers control how much dye to let seep in and will result in softer even blending. The dye that settles in the creases will be more saturated and darker. Transfer pleated cloth bundle into a zip-lock baggie for at least an hour and unfold. I realize this might be getting away from the historical
    traditional approach but might be worth a try. I like the name of your project. Years ago, in Santa Fe there was a hair salon named “Curl Up and Dye”. Keep forging ahead.

    1. Thanks, Michael! I did in fact do just as you suggested and dampened the bamboo scarf by soaking it in a mild soda ash bath before doing anything else. It really seemed to deepen the color! I re-dyed it today, you can see the results on the “iced aqua” posts, today and tomorrow.

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